Home Euthanasia Service

Making the decision to say good-bye to a beloved family member is one of the hardest parts of owning a pet. My passion is to make this emotional time as loving, compassionate, and stress-free as possible for both you and your pet. Even though every family and pet is different, here is a general idea of what you can expect.

When you are ready, we will talk by phone about your pet and what has brought you to this point. We will work out a time that suits both of our families' schedules. When I arrive, there is some paperwork to complete (forms are available from this site) and I will spend some time visiting with you and your pet. I will give a sedative to all cats and dogs first; this does tend to burn a little. I will place an I.V. catheter in a front leg to secure access to a vein. When you are ready, I will give a strong anesthetic that will slow the heart rate and breathing of your pet until they are gone. It is very quick, usually within 30 seconds. Their eyes won't close, and their bladder will relax. I will offer to pray with you before we start, and I will give you a hug when we are done.

I can clip some hair to help you remember your pet and/or make a clay paw impression. I will transport your pet for either cremation (group or private) or to the KSU Vet School for students to learn more about disease processes through necropsy.

How do you know it's time?

  • Is my pet getting any enjoyment at all from daily life, or is his daily existence something to be endured? (Quality of life issues)
  • Do the bad days outnumber the good days?  Are good days rare?
  • Is my pet in pain?
  • Has my pet stopped eating and/or drinking?
  • What's my vet's opinion?

How do you know it's time?

  • Is my pet getting any enjoyment at all from daily life, or is his daily existence something to be endured? (Quality of life issues)
  • Do the bad days outnumber the good days? Are good days rare?
  • Is my pet in pain?
  • Has my pet stopped eating and/or drinking?
  • What's my vet's opinion?

"The painful truth is your pet will eventually die. The decision you must make is not whether its life will end, but how, and how much discomfort you are willing to allow it to endure. Which choice will bring you the least cause for regret after your pet is gone? No regret is often not an option."  (Stefanie Schwartz, DVM)


Location

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Office Hours

Our Regular Schedule

Monday:

8am - 6pm

Tuesday:

8am - 6pm

Wednesday:

8am - 6pm

Thursday:

8am - 6pm

Friday:

8am - 6pm

Saturday:

By Appointments Only

Sunday:

By Appointments Only